Home > iam > long view identity thoughts – Gartner IAM Summit 2009 part 2

long view identity thoughts – Gartner IAM Summit 2009 part 2

I’ve been traveling like mad (writing this in Berlin). So this comes far too long after the show for my taste, but I really wanted to get this out there because there is some very good stuff to highlight.

The star of the Gartner IAM Summit was Earl Perkins. He has a way of saying things that makes the very obvious seem as wise as it should. The thoughts he concentrated on that left an impression on me were:

  1. There is too much focus on the C in GRC. Vendors are the most guilty here, since they tend to see compliance as the easiest route to sales success. If there is an audit finding or clear potential for one, you have a compelling event. It’s just as valid to talk about using IAM products in a way that removes risk and aids in governance, though; and the business uses those terms. Vendors are always looking for ways to address the business buyer vs. the technology buyer. Of course, that is also useful for the advocate of IAM projects within an organization. Talking to your customer internally about risk and governance makes them see you as proactive vs. reactive to compliance needs that arise from outside pressure.
  2. The auditor is your friend. I got to see Earl brief clients directly on this at the “breakfast with the analysts” session. I can’t agree more with this. Making the business take your IAM project more seriously by virtue of making it the auditor’s edict is a wonderful trick.

Reduction is another theme that came out of both the analyst and customer led sessions. All forms of reduction are good. Quest had a session highlighting our Authentication Services being used at Chevron, and that focused on reducing the overall number of identities in any enterprise by consolidating to AD for all Unix, Linux and Macs as well as many applications. But reducing the number of roles, the number of entitlement definitions and directory infrastructures was touched on again and again.

Last is a favorite of mine: reading the magic quadrant correctly. Gartner always says this clearly, but it feels like no one ever hears them. I look at the magic quadrant as three dimensional. The two dimensional graph is a ceiling where vendors who have made the cut poke through and show up in their respective areas, as if you were looking at the top of a cube. Turn the cube to it’s side and you would see the shorter lines which don’t make it to the top of the cube which all represent the vendors which are not good enough to be in the “magic ceiling”. Earl also revisited why there is still and likely to never be an IAM magic quadrant – there is no one definition to make a cohesive statement about.

A very good conference all in all. Can’t wait for the next one…

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